8/31/2008
Skip to the end

A couple of Saturdays ago, I was looking for a new pair of earphones, since mine was on the verge of conking out even if it seems fairly new. That meant I was virtually listening to the radio again - or, it will seem at least, I was forced to. It's actually amazing thinking how many will actually ask the supposedly friendly DJs for advice, like this one, for instance, whose story blared out of the loudspeakers of that second-floor store.

"Alam kong gasgas na 'tong tanong ko, pero pa'no po ba makaka-move on sa isang tao?"

At least she knew it's a damn clich├ęd question. She's this young girl who was involved in an affair with a married man. In true daytime soap fashion, the "legal wife" finds out and starts a confrontation. In true masa station fashion, we hear laughter tracks instead.

Knowing how to move on is one thing. I, for one, have asked the question so many times, but it seems things go well only when you stop asking and just let things be. I give up on something, and then I quickly forget about it. It's just one of those things that we never really understand.

But sometimes, it's not in how you move on, but when you move on. In principle, flipping to the next page is very easy. You just lift your finger, pick up one page and turn it over. If you badly want to press that fast-forward button, then you pick up a bunch of leaves and flip it over; it's virtually the Futureheads singing Skip to the End. But that's easy if you haven't really left anything behind. Unless you're really impatient, and are willing to forego some juicy details just to see if the protagonist is killed off, then you'll basically jump everything.

I eventually realized that it's not a matter of doing it right, but rather, a matter of doing it at the right time. Say, I've always said I'll turn my back on something, but how exactly do you do just that if you've given so much to it? Those guys called it "emotional investment," and that's something you can't just toss aside when you feel the need to skip everything. People don't realize the need to consider this - "kung ayaw mo na sa kanya, you've got to move on" - but that's why everything goes wrong.

Of course, you really hate the feeling of seeing someone you've given so much time to just leave without a trace?

The biggest catch, of course, is when that someone leaves you with a big mess. A ruptured psyche. A broken collective. A serious photocopy.

As much as we hate to admit it, some people can be so selfish. They just want to finish everything, but they forget - deliberately or otherwise - that there's so much to what they're doing than just going to the next chapter. You'll either not understand the story, or make a crease on the page, or tear it off altogether. That leaves a pretty nasty mark, really. A future reader will hate to see the most crucial part of a novel torn off. What more for your next chapter? What more for the chapter you just finished, or skipped altogether?

I can't exactly remember what the DJ answered the girl. I left the store and decided to look elsewhere. I got my earphones and thought I was ripped off initially, but it's just me and my sinking feeling every time I splurge. But at least, some get left behind, get on with things, and turn out to be so much better than they were. The others, well, get lost in the supermarket, looking for a replacement for that missing page.

And your responses...

is it that program in Energy Fm every saturday afternoon where listeners get to share their love dilemmas mala-Heart2Heart?

Anonymous Anonymous8/31/2008     

"Of course, you really hate the feeling of seeing someone you've given so much time to just leave without a trace?

The biggest catch, of course, is when that someone leaves you with a big mess. A ruptured psyche. A broken collective. A serious photocopy."

-- yeah. hell yeah. especially when your ex's house is just a stone's throw away from my house. haha.

Blogger jhie9/02/2008     

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